Most of my brides like some of their preparation photographed and I usually suggest that I arrive in time to capture the last hour or so.

For the photography, having space and light is always best. Although good photographers will adapt to any lighting situation a room with plenty of natural light is a good start.

If you’re getting ready at home then, unless you have particularly large bedrooms, you might want to consider using the drawing room or lounge instead. Your hairdresser and make-up artist will also appreciate a well-lit area to work in.

Similarly, if you’re preparing at a hotel try to get a room with large windows. If you’re starting at the actual venue and they have their own bridal suite check it out beforehand to see if it’s suitable.

Whilst you want the photographs to capture the reality of your prep time perhaps have somebody in charge of keeping litter to a minimum; sandwiches and glasses of Champagne look good but supermarket bags and pork pie wrappers don’t!

Again, allocate a bridesmaid to look after the wedding dress. Once your photographer arrives your dress should be out of its protective wrapping and hanging up ready to be photographed. If your dress designer doesn’t supply it with a beautiful hanger make sure you get yourself one from somewhere like John Lewis. It will cost a fraction of what dress does but makes all the difference in a photograph.

Make sure you allocate plenty of time. Most delays are a result of hairdressers and make-up artists over running. But let me add, before I get angry tweets, that most hair and make-up delays are due to these guys being given unscheduled heads to attend to. If you book hair and make-up for yourself and three bridesmaids don’t be surprised if there’s a half hour delay when, on the day, you add a flower girl and mother of the bride to the list. Forward planning and communication is the key here.